World’s Smallest Image ‘Nano-Chiseled’ from Polymer

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That patterning method used a heated silicon probe to evaporate the material in the substrate, leaving behind the desired pattern in 3D.

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In the popular “Deus Ex” video game series, nanotechnology can turn an average government agent into a bionic superman. In fact, nanotech augmentations in the human body aren’t just fun and games. Real-life applications will most likely become reality a lot sooner than you think. In 2007, the world’s first online inventory of nanotech products, Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies, found that nearly 500 products, including food, clothing and cosmetics, employed nanotechnology. In this slide show, explore how nanotech can make you stronger, tap into your brain and more. WATCH: NANOTECH REWARDS

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If you’re too busy to make it to the gym, nanotechnology could be a way to get fit without having to spend hours toiling away on machines. In fact, technology can take you a lot further than any free-weight or cardio regimen. In 2006, researchers at the University of Texas at Dallas reported in the journal Science that they had created alcohol- and hydrogen-fueled artificial muscles 100 times stronger and capable of 100 times more work than natural muscles. Functioning as both muscles and fuel cells, the technology has a range of applications from artificial limbs to autonomous robots. SCIENCE CHANNEL: Take the Nanotechnology Quiz

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If nanotechnology can make you stronger, could it also make you smarter? Scientists aren’t quite there yet, but nanotechnology applied to brain implants could treat a range of conditions from deafness to blindness to Parkinson’s disease and more, according to biomedical engineers from the University of Michigan. Nanotechnology could also be used to tap into the mind, and read and write information directly into the brain. In an unusual twist, the research was undertaken by telecommunications engineers at Nippon Telegraph and Telephone.